Polarising filters

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ralph
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Polarising filters

Post by ralph » Tue Jul 12, 2011 5:12 am

I have always used UV filters on my lenses, as much to protect the lens as cut 'blue haze', but having taken photos at a lake recently, I was ware that excessive reflection from the water had spoilt some of the shots. Today, I bought polarising filters for my two lenses, but cannot seem to find a definitive answer as to whether when using them, you remove the UV filter first or whether you just add them. I would appreciate any views on how they should be used. :?

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Mr Smith
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Re: Polarising filters

Post by Mr Smith » Tue Jul 12, 2011 5:18 am

You can just add it Ralph, if in doubt experiment try with UV then without and see what
the results are. I've always just added mine. I keep the UV on permanently and add the
polariser as needed.
Wise man talk because they have something to say,
fools talk because they have to say something.

ralph
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Re: Polarising filters

Post by ralph » Tue Jul 12, 2011 7:54 am

Thanks Mr Smith, that will save a lot of bother. Amazing what we turn our mind to at just after 5am - no lying in bed for we seniors eh :lol: .

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Mr Smith
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Re: Polarising filters

Post by Mr Smith » Tue Jul 12, 2011 8:55 am

ralph wrote:Thanks Mr Smith, that will save a lot of bother. Amazing what we turn our mind to at just after 5am - no lying in bed for we seniors eh :lol: .
I was up at 3.50am, did a load of washing before the wife got up to hang it out, she
won't let me hang it out as she doesn't want the neighbours to see me doing what she
should be doing. I'll be starting hoovering upstairs in a few minutes, the wife is going
out with the daughter, they get their hair done on a Tuesday. Fortunately the daughter
doesn't live with us but often stays on a Monday night so they can get out early shopping etc.
Wise man talk because they have something to say,
fools talk because they have to say something.

ralph
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Re: Polarising filters

Post by ralph » Tue Jul 12, 2011 10:11 am

There are more similarities in our lives :D , I look after my 82year old neighbour next door, and have just been in there, cooked him breakfast, made his bed, fed the cat, hoovered, and have just put his washing in the machine. being a youngster (66) I just have to do it. :lol:

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Re: Polarising filters

Post by sherri » Sat Jul 16, 2011 1:14 pm

ralph wrote:There are more similarities in our lives :D , I look after my 82year old neighbour next door, and have just been in there, cooked him breakfast, made his bed, fed the cat, hoovered, and have just put his washing in the machine. being a youngster (66) I just have to do it. :lol:
What a decent, caring sort of a person you sound, Ralph.
Sometimes I think there should be awards for people like you but so often those who really deserve them are never recognised.
I bet your neighbour is so relieved to have you next door, though!

For you: A cyber bunch. It's the most manly I can find. :D

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Re: Polarising filters

Post by westoelad » Sun Aug 07, 2011 8:18 pm

Ralph, as you are probably aware polarising filters are used to filter the light which is "polarised" perpendicular to the filter.
This type of filter used in strong lighting conditions such as a very sunny day can have the affect of making a bright blue sky darker and richer in colour and will also eliminate the amount of reflection from sources such as windows and water.
This filter is a must to any photographer shooting water and landscapes or "peeping" through windows...... :lol:
Digital SLR cameras use the "circular" type polarising filters which have two thin plates of glass which can be turned or dialled to produce the best desired effect for the lighting / reflective situation.
Whilst this kind of manipulation can be an excellent tool used outdoors, many a decent indoor shot has been spoilt because the filter has been left on and rendered the resulting shot strangely dark - which then needs to be rectified if possible in some form of post processing.
Black and white photography can gain some very nice contrasts with these filters producing sharp rich tonal qualities especially on landscapes with strong contrasts such as white buildings on a sea front.
The caveat with any thing made from glass is to buy a decent optic and not to be tempted by the cheap and cheerful, in this market you gets what you pays for and you will pay for what you gets.

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Re: Polarising filters

Post by westoelad » Mon Aug 08, 2011 8:41 pm

Why use a UV filter at all! apart from protection of your expensive glass.

Nice article from a well revered photographer should answer your question.........

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/how-to- ... mateur.htm

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danet
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Re: Polarising filters

Post by danet » Mon Aug 08, 2011 10:15 pm

I found one of the only times a circular polarizing filter was good, was in bright sunny 'reflective' days. If you wanted to take photos of water, or through glass (such as house, cars etc), then the circular polarizing filter was excellent in these situations, but for anything else, I didn't have much use for them, and if not careful, can make some everyday type photos look too dark. So it has it's uses in some places where there is a lot of reflectiions that need eliminating.

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Re: Polarising filters

Post by ralph » Sat Aug 20, 2011 10:51 pm

I hadn't been back to this board for a while and apologise for that as I hadn't thanked those who replied to my post. First, thanks Danet for your posy and kind comments about my efforts on behalf of my neighbour Enzo, they are very much appreciated.

Second, thanks Westoelad for your helpful advice on polarising filters. I bought them for my existing lenses and have used them to good effect on a couple of occasions when photographing waterfowl, where I was able to cut out much of the water surface glare.

I'm now moving on to another interest, photographing insects and flowers. I have been managing quite well with my Tamron 70 - 300 mm macro (not 1.1) ,but half size, and some quite good results mith my Canon 50mm f1.4, just getting in close. Today, I could hold out no longer and have ordered the Canon 100mm f2.8 IS USM Macro. I was disappointed when I found the Jessops shop nearest to me didn't have it in stock, but it has been promised for Monday or Tuesday! I don't suppose I'm going to notice any super improvement - it was just pure indulgence. I suppose I was motivated to act now, when a friend said :"At our age, we perhaps shouldn't even be buying green bananas." :lol: :lol: :lol:

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Re: Polarising filters

Post by westoelad » Sun Aug 21, 2011 6:35 pm

You will notice a difference when you get this specialised Canon lens for your macro and even portrait shots. Ken Rockwell has a nice review of the lens on his site before it was enhanced with the IS treatment. I always try and see if he has a review on anything I fancy before buying - the guy is just one of us and tells it as it is without trying to baffle you with science.
I have noticed a decline in Jessops over the last few years they never seem to have what you want in store but they do seem to specialise in printing your images or speedy developments. Directly opposite Jessops in Newcastle is Jacobs and they stock everything that is on their web sight in the local store which is manned by good knowledgeable people they are my first choice when buying or seeking advise.
Your prime EF 50mm f1.4 is nice bit of kit, one many Canon users have as their standard lens and does produce very good results knocking the socks off the kits lens supplied by Canon. At a fraction over £300 this lens is a steal especially If you can get the legendary mark one version which in many instances is said to be better than the L series lens costing four times the price.
Let us know how you get on with your photography and never mind thse ripe bananas or reading War and Piece - life is precious and there to be lived - I believe in having your toys and playing with them while you can!

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Re: Polarising filters

Post by ralph » Sun Aug 21, 2011 7:25 pm

You're right of course! While toying with what lens to buy, I saw a canon 100mm - 400mm zoom (the white one) in a second hand shop near to me, and knowing the reputation of these lenses to be built like a tank (and weighing nearly as much :D ), I decided to find out the price. On line, I found that when buying them, they pay £525, but when selling, they are asking £875 :shock: I know that's a lot less than you have to pay for a new one, but it's still one hell of a profit! I dropped a note saying so and said if they cannot sell it, I would be prepared to pay £700 and no more. I thought: "Am I being over cheeky?" Then thought well not as much as they are trying to make that much profit :lol: .

I don't suppose I will hear any more about it - but then he who dares just might win [-o< .

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