Whats the best dance clubs in Newcastle!!!!!

Info on our local pubs & clubs
Sir Alex
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Whats the best dance clubs in Newcastle!!!!!

Post by Sir Alex » Sun Aug 21, 2005 7:22 pm

For me, :D i think its gotta be Ikon.! the music is sorted!
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Post by memor » Mon Aug 22, 2005 6:24 pm

We Sanddancers. We not get to foreign places like Newwycastle.

Some of us not have passport or phrase book.
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Post by brian c » Mon Aug 22, 2005 7:39 pm

The store hall in Jarrow about 1960

Fabulous,

I fell in love every time I went there. :wink:
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STUPID YOU ARE.................

BREED YOU SHOULD NOT!

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Post by Sir Alex » Sun Aug 28, 2005 6:15 pm

Sanky soaps! :D
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sid the sexist

mong

Post by sid the sexist » Mon Sep 05, 2005 5:34 pm

:5dunce:

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Post by Sir Alex » Tue Sep 06, 2005 11:23 am

^^^^ :shock:
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Post by Jane Doe » Wed Nov 09, 2005 5:43 pm

I'm a bit puzzled by the title of this message board. As it's on a site about South Shields and the subject of this board is, apparently, the town centre - why is it titled 'Doon Toon' notice board?

In South Shields the town centre is called 'Down Street'. To me, mention 'Toon' and that means our beloved Newcastle.

memor wrote: "We Sanddancers. We not get to foreign places like Newwycastle. Some of us not have passport or phrase book."

What are you talking about Memor? 'Foreign places' - Newcastle? Are you saying that South Shields people aren't Geordies? :evil: I think you're getting a bit mixed up bonny lad!

You do know that South Shields is on Tyneside (A.K.A Geordieland), don't you??? And that Newcastle is the capital of Geordie Land??? Therefore why would we need a passport or phrase book to go to our capital city?

Now if you'd said that about Sunderland I would have understood. (For a start, the Mackums have a lingo all their own!) And if a 'passport' was needed to get anywhere it would be Sunderland - as it's not on Tyneside.

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Post by Sanddancer » Thu Nov 10, 2005 6:49 pm

Correct me if I'm wrong, and I dare say someone will :-k , but I thought the term "geordie" came from Northumberland when the local people professed to being King Georges Men or Geordies men. This being the case, as South Shields was originally part of Durham, how can Shields people justify the claim to be Geordies :?:

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Post by Jane Doe » Tue Nov 15, 2005 6:09 pm

Sanddancer wrote:Correct me if I'm wrong, and I dare say someone will :-k , but I thought the term "geordie" came from Northumberland when the local people professed to being King Georges Men or Geordies men. This being the case, as South Shields was originally part of Durham, how can Shields people justify the claim to be Geordies :?:
Sand dancer, you ask what justifies someone from South Shields being termed a “Geordie”?

Well as it has been pointed out already, the origin of the term “Geordie” has a number of theories and it depends on which one you go with.

Theory:
The George Stephenson V Sir Humphrey Davy miners' lamp. Miners in the north preferred the Stephenson lamp (The lamp and later the miners became known as Geordies). Further south, they preferred the ‘Davy lamp’. [See link below]

If this is the true theory then it was ONLY miners that could be ‘Geordies’ – and they’re all gone now.

Theory:
“In 1826, George Stephenson (of ‘The Rocket’ fame) gave evidence to a Parliamentary Commission on Railways where he was sneered at for his blunt vowels and dialect. After that Londoners began calling the sailors of the barges that carried coal from the Tyne to the Thames 'Geordies'.” [See link below]

http://englishculture.allinfoabout.com/ ... names.html

Theory:
“Geordie refers to a person originating from Tyneside and the former coal mining areas of Northern County Durham or the dialect spoken by such people….” [See links below]

But the most popular theory is: The Jacobite Rebellions of 1715 & 1745.

When you said "... but I thought the term "geordie" came from Northumberland when the local people professed to being King Georges Men or Geordies men. " Sorry but you are totally wrong about that. During the Jacobite rebellions, Northumberland was on the side of the Jacobites, therefore NOT Geordies at all - if that's the theory you go with.

In 1715 the Jacobites from Scotland wanted to overthrow the Hanovian King of England, the protestant King George I, and put their Scottish Catholic King, James Stuart (aka, the ‘Old Pretender’) on the English throne. They failed.

In 1745 the Jacobites rebelled again, this time wanting to replace King George II with Bonny Prince Charlie (aka the ‘Young Pretender’.) Again they failed. But in both attempts they were supported by the Northumbrians, led by General Tom Forster of Bamburgh. (So although a lot of people think of Northumbrians as being ‘Geordies’ they were in fact the opposite.)

Although Northumbria was in support of the Jacobites, Newcastle and the north-east wasn’t and the Jacobite army had to go down south via the western side of the country (through Carlisle).

“Unfortunately for the Jacobites of 1745 there seems to have been little support for this new rebellion in North East England. Newcastle's trade and livelihood depended so vitally on royal approval that its merchants and gentry could not risk becoming involved in a plot against the new king. There were some Jacobite sympathisers in the town, especially among the working classes, but officially the Newcastle folk had to declare for King `Geordie'. [See links below]

It wouldn’t have only been Newcastle’s livelihood that would have suffered but all the little villages (they were little more than that at the time) along both sides of the Tyne, including South Shields.

Also, if the rest of Tyneside had been in opposition to Newcastle’s decision to support both King Georges there would have been a record of the fact, just as it is recorded that Northumbrians were in support of the Jacobites. And the Jacobites could have crossed the Tyne further east if they’d had support from the likes of North & South Shields, Jarrow etc. As it was, because of lack of support, they had to head west and go down south via Carlisle.

“Military forces supporting King George were established at Framwelgate Moor and outside Newcastle to meet the expected invasion. In the event the Jacobites headed south down the western side of the country via Cumbria and Carlisle in the hope that they would eventually reach London and restore the Stuarts to the throne.” [See links below]

When the Jacobites declared Newcastle to be ‘Geordies’ they probably meant the general Tyneside area but didn’t go the whole nine yards of naming each individual place, “Newcastle, Gateshead, North Shields, hebburn, Jarrow and South Shields are ‘Geordies’ men.” Also, as Newcastle was the largest and most well known town on the Tyne, they probably didn’t even know the names of the other, smaller places. (Even today, it’s the same when on holiday. In my experience, say you’re from South Shields and people ask “Where’s that?” Mention Newcastle and they usually know where you mean.)

http://www.newcastle-online.com/geordies.shtml

http://www.thenortheast.fsnet.co.uk/GeordieOrigins.htm

http://www.thisisthenortheast.co.uk/the ... der/8.html
--------------------------------------
You say that South Shields was in County Durham…

Yes, South Shields was in the County of Durham because of the way the medieval monarchy and church carved up the land between them (supposedly for admin. purposes). But I don’t suppose it occurred to them that South Shields is much nearer to Northumberland than it is to Durham. And S.S. has had strong links with Newcastle since Roman times (before these boundaries existed).

Before the medieval carve up though (rewind a few hundred years), in the days of the Angles, South Shields had been part of Northumbria. Of course it wasn’t called ‘South Shields’ then but it is the same land that we now know as South Shields. (See Bernica and Deira in the link below.)

Then in 1974 boundary changes introduced a new, and much more sensible county, Tyne and Wear, which at least is geographically more accurate and acknowledges the South Shields / Tyne connection.

In another few hundred years the bureaucrats of the day might decide to change boundaries again and who knows where South Shields might be placed – it might even end up back as part of Northumbria.

http://www.thenortheast.fsnet.co.uk/Kin ... umbria.htm - BERNICIA

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Post by memor » Tue Nov 15, 2005 6:52 pm

Of course Northumberland stretched from the Scottish border to just

north of the river Humber.
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Post by Sanddancer » Tue Nov 15, 2005 7:53 pm

Thanks Jane Doe, you have obviously carried out a good deal of research into the subject.
However a Rose, by any other name will still be a Rose, and a Sanddancer will remain a sanddancer :D

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Post by memor » Tue Nov 15, 2005 9:06 pm

Blue Dave why do you think its called NORTHUMBERLAND.

Its LAND NORTH of the HUMBER.

Northumbria is just a fancy name invented by Sloane Rangers.
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Post by baldy.smith » Tue Nov 15, 2005 9:27 pm

Northumbria was a kingdom in years gone by. Northumberland is a county formed many years later.

If Northumberland is the land north of the Humber does that mean Scotland is or was in Northumberland? :?

8)

baldy.smith

Post by baldy.smith » Tue Nov 15, 2005 9:29 pm

Anyway what has all this got to do with dance clubs?

8)

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Post by Jane Doe » Wed Nov 16, 2005 4:19 pm

Sanddancer wrote:Thanks Jane Doe, you have obviously carried out a good deal of research into the subject.
However a Rose, by any other name will still be a Rose, and a Sanddancer will remain a sanddancer :D
What were Shields people before the 1920's then? And as Neil T pointed out on the other MB (the General MB): most people in S.S. would consider themselves Geordies not sand dancers (that's just a 'joke').

You can call yourself a sand dancer if you like - I'm a Geordie. Ta ra pet.

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Post by Jane Doe » Wed Nov 16, 2005 4:26 pm

BlueDave wrote:Sorry memor but that was northumbria as opposed to northumberland which covers a far lesser area.
That being said Jane Does explanations far outlast anyones actual interest in the subject I'd wager. :wink:
"The name appears also in the titles of today's Northumbria Police (which covers Northumberland and Tyne and Wear), Northumbria University (which has campuses in Newcastle upon Tyne, Morpeth, and Carlisle), and Northumbrian Water (which serves the region of North East England), and the name has been adopted by the English Tourist Board as a name for the region."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northumbria

Re: "Jane Does explanations far outlast anyones actual interest in the subject I'd wager."

My bit of controversy has stirred lots of interest and replies. It even encouraged a normally silent 'viewer' to post.

Ta ra Bluey.

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Post by Jane Doe » Wed Nov 16, 2005 4:32 pm

baldy.smith wrote:Northumbria was a kingdom in years gone by. Northumberland is a county formed many years later.

If Northumberland is the land north of the Humber does that mean Scotland is or was in Northumberland? :?

8)

It had it's boundaries.

Ta ra Baldy (no offence - just using your name).

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Post by Jane Doe » Wed Nov 16, 2005 4:38 pm

memor wrote:Blue Dave why do you think its called NORTHUMBERLAND.

Its LAND NORTH of the HUMBER.

Northumbria is just a fancy name invented by Sloane Rangers.
:lol: A think that's what it is with the name sand dancers - it's people who fancy thasels as bein a bit diffrunt and want a swanky term for the place they come from.

Ta ra memor (where ever ye cum from - a still cannit work ye oot! A thinks ye a the foreigner!)

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